Quebec Book News

This is the place to come for the latest news on Quebec literature in English, with links to new book reviews, articles, and more.


Congratulations to Le Quartanier and Stéphane Larue (Le plongeur) and Alto and Emily St. John Mandel (Station Eleven) for their Prix des libraires 2017 success. Looking forward to Pablo Strauss’s translation of Le Plongeur for Biblioasis.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congratulations to Martine Desjardins and Alto on La chambre verte winning this year’s Prix Jacques-Brossard for science fiction and fantasy writing in Québec.
You can read our review here and look forward to the upcoming translation from Talonbooks.


Nous étions le sel de la mer by Roxanne Bouchard (VLB éditeur) is to be published in the UK in translation by Orenda Books in 2018. You can read our extract in translation from David Warriner here.


The Party Wall (our review here) has been shortlisted for the 2017 French-American Foundation’s Translation Prize.


Excited to hear that Zora, which we reviewed here, will be published in translation (Fred A. Reed, David Homel) by Talonbooks.

Photo credit: Lionel Michée


The finalists for the 2017 Prix des libraires du Québec have just been announced.

5 novels are in the running:

Autour d’elle by Sophie Bienvenu (Le Cheval d’août éditeur)
Le poids de la neige by Christian Guay-Poliquin (La Peuplade)
Le plongeur by Stéphane Larue (Le Quartanier Éditeur)
Étincelle by Michèle Plomer (Les Éditions Marchand de feuilles)
Ukraine à fragmentation by Frédérick Lavoie (La Peuplade)

There is also an outside-Quebec and a poetry category. Congratulations to all concerned!

Prix des libraires 2017


Kubrick Red in the The Globe and Mail
By Simon Roy, translated by Jacob Homel
Anvil Press
“Just as Kubrick used Stephen King’s novel to talk about the horrors of genocide revisited on the present, in Kubrick Red Roy analyses the film to exorcise a crime in his family’s past. An atypical memoir tracing genealogies of violence – as startling as the film that inspired it.”

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/books-and-media/book-reviews/emily-bittos-the-strays-graham-jacksons-the-jane-loop-and-simon-roys-kubrick-red-reviewed/article33791693/

 


Carly Rosalie Vandergriendt is a Montreal-based writer. Her story “Playing the Man” is published in Plenitude magazine.

“Below, leaves rustle and swish. The sound reminds me of an ocean, makes me crave a body of water that’s not a city pool packed with bobbing children. It takes looking at a map to realize Montréal is an island. Pinning my phone to my shoulder, I grip the railing of our second-floor balcony, lean over, and look down. She’s in her garden. Our Lady of the Tomatoes.”


wordland


Author Cora Siré will be launching her latest novel BEHOLD THINGS BEAUTIFUL at the Atwater Library (1200 Atwater Avenue).

SPECIAL GUEST: Cellist Jane Chan.

Refreshments will be served.
Admission is free.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

After twelve years in exile, living and teaching in the safety of Montreal, Alma Alvarez has been persuaded to return to Luscano by her old friend Flaco, who has invited her give a lecture at his university on the tragic Uruguayan poet Delmira Agustini, a writer with a cult-like following known for her erotic poetry and film noir demise.

Having been arrested herself after the publication of a poem which offended the military regime, Alma knows how influential and dangerous poetry can be. But her mother is dying, and her return to Luscano feels inevitable. She soon discovers that life in Luscano is still rife with secrecy and duplicity. And Flaco turns out to have a hidden agenda as well. As Alma attempts to readapt to a country that, despite its seductive charms, may not have broke free of its brutal past, she catches sight of the man whose actions prompted her exile and begins to follow him in secret.

The imaginary country of Luscano, an amalgam of Uruguay, Argentina and Chile, is vibrantly brought to life with a nod to the region’s literary tradition of magic realism.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Cora Siré writes poetry, essays and fiction. Her poems have appeared in Descant, the Literary Review of Canada, The Best Canadian Poetry in English 2009 (Tightrope Books) and Sus huellas son letras (Éditions Alondras, 2011). Born in Canada, she often writes of elsewheres, both real and imaginary, drawing on her encounters in realms ranging from Argentina to Vietnam and her family’s history of displacement. She lives in Montréal.

Behold


We’re looking forward to the latest translation from Véhicule Press!

SUN


Heather O’Neill is at the Height of Her Literary Powers.
Does The Lonely Hearts Hotel mark the beginning of her second act?
https://thewalrus.ca/heather-oneill-at-the-height-of-her-literary-powers
Heather